Online Identities

Some people use online identities to protect their real identities.  To me this is sort of silly.  I host a blog so I’m obviously fairly open about just about everything and have nothing to hide.  I’ve used many different identities over the years but most have been variations on a theme to let my friends find me easily. I’ve gravitated towards using variations of my real name for services and social networks and variations on my old PlanetSide character for video games.

I’ve compiled the list below in an effort to document the many different identities I’ve had over the years.

Disclaimer: The identities only changed when I found other users with my same name so there is obviously more people out there than me using these names.  As such search results are mediocre at best.

rand1094 – the oldest one I can remember (although there were older) created October of 1994 and still used today on AIM

xeroed
xer0ed
ravenger
randroam
randya
ravennger
randyaa
randiesel
dieselrand
xeroin
xeromax
xeroprime
xero mills
xero daniels
xero crown
kratos gwar
infinity vo
infinity
infinity daniels
infinity collins
infinity tullamore
infinity ballantine

PS if you do decide to search for any of them let me know if you find anything interesting.

Your Tweets

Ever wanted to know your Twitter trends? Well now you can generate a cloud of all your tweets using Tweet Clouds. My Cloud is below. Clearly I need to stop replying to @npike so much.

My Tweet Cloud

Now that you know the words you use most frequently, wouldn’t it be nice to know how you used them? That’s where Tweet Scan comes in handy. In fact the tag cloud Tweet Cloud gets you has links but they go nowhere (every one just links to #, I’m not sure what that’s useful for…). This following is the Tweet Scan search results for Rochester for my username only.

Tweet Scan Results for Rochester for user Randyaa

Ask the winner

Ask.comA few days ago I was watching Webb Alert when she mentioned the search result differences between Google and Ask. It was clear that Ask is the winner. I couldn’t believe the difference. Take a Google search for the San Fransisco 49ers for example. The top Google search results are mostly sponsored links and ticket sales. Do the same search for the San Fransisco 49ers on Ask.com and you get much more meaningful results. In fact as you’re typing ask even suggests searches for you. Google has had Google Suggest for a long time but for some reason they’ve never pushed it into their main search.

Now that Ask has turned around, will Google see them as a threat and make some changes?