Pictorial Webster's Fine Print Edition

law booksA major portion of business for the company I work for is fine (legal) book publishing.   They’ve moved mostly online now but book printing & publishing is still a big part.  As a result, this video on how the Pictorial Webster’s Fine Print Edition was put together is immensely interesting to me.  I realize the legal books we have around probably aren’t put together with the same hand-crafted level of precision and dedication, but it’s still interesting and the process is most likely similar.

Pictorial Webster’s: Inspiration to Completion from John Carrera on Vimeo.

Mystery Candy


Our Christmas gift at work was pretty lame this year. They gave us orange reusable grocery bags with the company logo on it. Yes, exactly like the reusable Wegmans bags you can buy for $.99.

At first I wasn’t quite sure what to do with it. Someone made the comment that it was supposed to be a Halloween present and they were just late. Not to be deterred in obtaining candy of any kind I hung it on the outside of my cube wall as a joke.

After a few days there was a lump. CANDY! Candy then started appearing fairly regularly. First a hotball, then some dum dums, a kit kat bar and now this…

I’m not really quite sure what to make of what appears to be homemade candy.

1 – I have no idea what it is
2 – I have no idea if it’s poisoned
3 – I have no idea who made it

Candy keeps appearing and as long as I know what it is and it’s sealed I’ll probably keep eating it (or giving it away).

If I knew who kept leaving it perhaps I’d say thanks… For now, anyone want some homemade candy?

Broad Street

I love local history.  I work in an old company in an old building with a lot of history in an old City.  Recently they sent out some information about the different stages the area the building is in has gone through along with pictures from the Rochester Public Library and the Rochester City Hall Photo Lab of the area.  Since it’s public information I thought I should share it.

In this view from 1855, the new aqueduct runs past the ruins of the first one. In 1845 Josiah Bissell built a house using much of the sandstone from the first aqueduct, cleaning up the river for the city in the bargain.

Josiah Bissell’s house, built from the red sandstone blocks of the ruined first aqueduct. See it today at 660 East Ave. at the corner of and Upton Park. It has since been expanded and is now the Rochester Methodist Home.

Rochester in the late 1880s, looking straight toward the future Aqueduct campus site. The Erie Canal and new aqueduct flow beyond the pedestrian lift bridges where Exchange St. now crosses Broad St. Old City Hall is at far left, looking much the same as it does today.

The Butts Building, newly built in 1895 with the familiar wedge shape. Six stories tall, two windows wide on the west side; six windows wide over the river. The new aqueduct and canal flow past at the first floor.

The same view in 1971. The Aqueduct Bldg. sports a new front entrance facing Broad St. at the second floor street level. Bldgs. 2 to 4 are complete. Bldg. 1 gained a seventh floor in 1951.

1897 photo of the busy aqueduct crossing the Genesee River. At left is the Kimball Tobacco Company, with the original location of the Mercury statue just visible above the smokestack. At right is the six-story Butts Building, shown here as the home of the Utz & Dunn shoe factory.

Sometime around moving day, circa 1901. Bldg. 1 with the names of Utz & Dunn and other former tenants scrubbed off. Names of the Lawyers Co-operative Publishing Co., Burke & White Bookbinders and E.R. Andrews Printing Co. will soon be painted on.

The Aqueduct Building in 1906. Note that Bldg. 1 has no seventh floor yet. Bldg. 2 will soon replace the four low buildings next door. McCauley-Fien Milling Co. has the white sign further downriver. At far right, four-story buildings line the Main Street bridge, hanging over the river. The original Democrat & Chronicle building is next to them on the riverbank.

In 1917, two years prior to the transition from canal to Broad St., Bldg. 1 is still six stories tall, but Bldg. 2 has arrived with seven floors. Today’s Bldgs. 3 and 4 don’t yet exist. Cluett, Peabody & Co., makers of Arrow shirts and collars, occupies the old Kimball Tobacco Company.

1925 photo: Looking east, construction of the subway in front of the Aqueduct Building. The Broad St. bridge temporarily serves as a parking lot. Note the long pedestrian ramp exiting the subway between the street and “our” sidewalk. Also, note the man walking down the stairs into the subway at the corner of Broad and Exchange streets.

The same view in 1927. Note the completed pedestrian ramp and subway stairs from the earlier photo. In the distance, Broad St. ended at South Ave. and the Osburn House hotel. The Rundel Library didn’t start construction until 1933. Standing on the future site of the LCP parking lot, the large “Bee Hive Building,” or RG&E power station No. 25, dwarfs the Herald Bldg. (B5) next to it.

Present-day view of the river and aqueduct buildings, looking towards the Main St. bridge. Aqueduct Park graces downtown Rochester and the statue of Mercury once again stands tall on the Rochester skyline.

Vintage Views of Rochester

A short time ago I found a website that has lots of historical photos and postcards along with time-lines named Vintage Views of Rochester. Apparently I’m the last person in Rochester to find it, but i thought I’d share it anyway. The following is a postcard depicting the aqueduct (broad street) as well as the building I work in (the large brick building in the center of the postcard).

Genesee River and Aqueduct

The Amazing Maize Maze

The Cool BusYou can always tell its fall again when my department organizes the annual Maize Maze team building exercise. This year is no different and Friday my team (consisting of myself, Mike and Matt) came in 3rd overall and 2nd among those obtaining all pieces to the map.

While we were at the Farm we had to give the coops something to do and we arrive at the ‘Cool Bus’ Ryan and Matt are up front with our coops, Anne, Andrew and Matt taking the backseats.

Definitely beats working for a few hours!

Contractors vs Content

A coworker recently told me a story about a previous project he was on. Quite typical of any Big Company.

I had a project manager that had some money in her project budget that needed to be spent…it’s around October time so she’s really starting to look for ways…the project is delayed because we can’t get content from the providers (we were converting from their format to ours). She says “I’ve got money in our project that we could use for contractors to help with development.” I said we don’t need developers, we need content. She says “well, we’ve got the money so why not hire some contractors?” I replied that I don’t have anything for contractors to do. she then asks “well, let’s say we get a contractor or 2…what would you have them do?” I’m sitting there looking at this woman thinking she’s either f-ed in the head or deaf and say “I’d buy them airline tickets to Australia and have them go get us the content”…the meeting ended shortly thereafter